What does Environments Management and a spiderweb have in common?

There is a look that you learn to identify in the early stages of taking on an Environments Management role. It’s somewhere between bashful, hopeful and slightly desperate. Occasionally it is preceded by a slightly nervous cough. And without fail it means a project has underestimated their requirements and they need you to magic something up… ideally within the next hour. Tomorrow will do.

One of the biggest challenges facing Environment Managers today is the speed that project environment requirements change. As projects become more agile, so the assumption is, should the environments that support them. However, no cash-conscious IT department will run extra environments ‘just in case’ – it doesn’t matter whether the applications are based on-premise, in the cloud or a hybrid of the two – this is just burning money. Also not every type of environment can be spun up at the drop of a hat – those with multiple integrations and specific connectivity requirements will take time if they are not part of a standard automated rig. At any given time an Environment Manager has to run the leanest ship possible, but remain flexible enough to deal with a certain ‘unspecified amount of changing requirements.’

So what is the best way I have found to handle this?

I will use the analogy of a  spiders web. In order to use the web to best effect the spider has to sit in a place where it can feel any single string vibrating at any time. The same goes for an Environment Manager. Except in our case the strings are radiating lines of communication.

Communication is probably the single biggest asset in an Environment Managers predictive arsenal. If you can build solid working relationships with people at every stage of a Release lifecycle – from the Business Analyst that shapes the projects, to the Project Managers that will run them, to the Technical resources that build them, the Testers that check them and to the Release team that puts the whole package live, you will have a far better chance of hearing or seeing about new or changing requirements before they are formally asked for. Nothing ever comes completely out of the blue.

It does take time to  build up your spiderweb (and you may get some odd looks at first from people who have never even heard of a Environment Manager, let alone spoken to one)- but I assure you -its worth it. The only downside is that after a while you will probably get a bit of a reputation with your Project teams for predicting the future.

Networking and Wallflower-itis

Social Networking is difficult.

Well it is for me.

Back in the mists of time – before I even knew that Environments Management was A Thing – I worked as a Website and Brand Designer (yes… I have a Arts degree…don’t bother asking how I got here – its very convoluted). I did this as a job for just over 3 years. One of my responsibilities was to go out to new clients and pitch, and I’ll be honest, this experience pretty much put me off direct networking. I have always found online networking far easier to get to grips with.

Continue reading